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Is your child a victim of parental alienation syndrome?

When a co-parent tries to alienate you from your child, this is parental alienation. Many courts consider it an abusive behavior. Because of its abusive nature, children who suffer through it often develop parental alienation syndrome (PAS).

What is PAS, exactly? How does it impact your child? And how far into the future can PAS influence your child’s life and well-being?

Signs of PAS

Psychology Today looks at the impact of PAS on children. PAS can affect any child going through parental alienation. Many do not realize they have fallen victim despite displaying signs of PAS. A few of the signs that are easiest to notice include:

  • Negative changes to temperament or personality
  • Increased stress and anxiety
  • Increased instances of lashing out at others
  • An increasing negative view of the self

Children with PAS tend to turn their blame inward or outward. Depending on that, they may start to have trouble with peers and figures of authority. Children who direct their blame inward often suffer from guilt complexes.

Lingering effects of PAS in adults

In later life, adults who suffered from PAS as kids have a higher rate of depression and anxiety. Some develop stress disorders. Many also fail to form good coping mechanisms as children. This can lead to issues like alcoholism and addiction later in life.

On top of that, these adults also claim to have a hard time trusting others. This interferes with their ability to form platonic and romantic relationships. Many who marry are at risk of divorcing like their parents.

Because of this long-term impact, it is important to take action as soon as you believe something is wrong. Consider talking to a legal expert about your situation.